Gabriella
Gabriella
Gabriella

Michael Gesinger

Gabriella

1996

Unique Hand-Painted Gelatin Silver Photograph

Pristine condition

certified authentic
Add to Collection $750.00
Gabriella
Gabriella
Gabriella

Details

Description

Gelatin Silver photograph by Michael Gesinger, 'Gabriella, 2008." Individually handmade by Michael Gesinger from 6x7 format film with fiber-based photographic paper and painted with Marshall’s Oils. Mounted on cotton rag museum board. Signed, dated and numbered in an edition of 36 in pencil on mount.

Condition

The HD Video of the actual work in question has been provided as a visual condition report. If you would like a written condition report in addition to the HD video, please

Medium

Like many of our other black and white photographers, Michael Gesinger is working with medium format film (6×7 format) and making gelatin silver photographs by hand in his own darkroom. While the photographic process and paper may be the same, the one difference is is that his are hand-painted. Prior to the invention of color processing, artists would often color their photographs with oil paint. Marshall’s Photo Oils are transparent oil colors specifically designed for tinting black-and-white photographs by hand. The surface of the gelatin silver paper is also very important. For example, you can color on a semi-matte or matte surface, but you cannot use photo oils on a glossy surface. Highly concentrated and intermixable, they offer superior adhesion on photo paper. They’re also acid-free and archival to ensure the long-term stability of the artwork. Michael makes sure the black and white photograph is approximately 10% lighter than he would make if he wasn’t using this process. The gelatin silver must have a moderate contrast – not flat, but not too high. There must be plenty of shadow and highlight detail, because photo oils are transparent – an area that is too light will appear too light, while a deep black will not reflect the color at all. Now that most color darkroom photographic papers have been discontinued, many artists are returning to this method of “making” color photographs.