Hand with Clouds
Hand with Clouds
Hand with Clouds

Joyce Tenneson

Hand with Clouds

1991

Original Polaroid Photograph

Image dimensions: 20" (w) x 24" (h)
Mounted dimensions: 30" (w) x 36" (h)

Pristine condition

certified authentic
Add to Collection — $6,000
Hand with Clouds
Hand with Clouds
Hand with Clouds

Details

Description

Unique 20" x 24" Polaroid by Joyce Tenneson, "Hand with Clouds." Handmade by Joyce Tenneson in 1989. Polaroid's 20" x 24" Polacolor film was available for 40 years, until it was discontinued in 2008. This piece is considered historical artifact, as well as a unique work of art.

Condition

The HD Video of the actual work in question has been provided as a visual condition report. If you would like a written condition report in addition to the HD video, please

Medium

20x24 polaroid

This massive view camera is five-foot tall, 235 pounds and produces arresting, startlingly de­ tailed 20 x 24 inch instant black-and-white and color contact photographs, or Polaroids. Developed to accurately reproduce works of art, especially paintings and tapestries, the camera was soon used as a creative tool to make original photographs. At 20×24 studios in New York City, Boston, Cambridge, Prague, and San Francisco, talented artists explored the large-format system for personal expression.

Famous artists like Chuck Close, William Wegman, Joyce Tenneson, Ansel Adams, Robert Mapplethorpe, Andy Warhol, and Annie Liebowitz produced bodies of work with the camera before Polaroid discontinued the film in 2016.

After an exposure is made, a motor pushes the negative-positive sandwich through huge, high-tech rollers to spread the developer, and the print is sliced from the camera with a common box cutter. After 90 to 100 seconds the film positive is care­ fully pulled apart from the negative, and the finished piece is ready with their trade­mark chemical smear borders.

The film comes in color and black and white. John Reuter, director of the Polaroid “20×24” studio in New York for 25 years notes, “Joyce Tenneson experimented extensively with both films and her vision was unique to the camera.”

These striking photographs are already one of a kind because there is no negative, only the one unique positive.